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by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
science on earth. and this is an odd kind of expedition for another reason. usually scientists go off in different directions, different times using their own tools. for mer the entire team was all together. 150 scientists and engineers balancing together, as it were, like on a huge skateboard creeping over the sand, up the down and hills and craters meters at a time for eight years. so it's something like being on a ship, on an early voyageover discovery. the scientists and the sailing crew were all having to travel together. they had to negotiate how long are we going to stay here in where are we going to go next in and what should we do at each site? and this requires a well coordinated understanding of their roles, schedules, resources, long-term plans and a clear chain of command. if you visited the science and engineering coordination meeting during the prime mission, which was the first 90 days of landing on mars in 2004, same thing we're going through now with curiosity during these 90 days, you could see the scientists up front on the bridge, as it were, with huge displays of
a carcinogen in their bodies. >> i would go back to medical fact and science. according to evidence based medicine. >> this is the world health organization. >> birth control is safe, and it is 90 percent effective. in relation to talking to the 13 and 15 year-old, we believe that is the role of a parent. what we do every single day is encourage parents to have conversations with their children. the vast majority of teenagers in texas want to hear from their parents about their bodies. planned parenthood de amelie teach your but the science. we hope you teach them about the immorality, your gun, and your views on science. again, we believe that all people have the right to scientifically based medically accurate information. [applause] >> hi. i'm laura. catholic wife of one, mother of two. i am here to give probably a different perspective about contraception and i hope to be a voice of a different option for all these beautiful men and women in the audience. i have been married for 20 years . i embrace the gift of the catholic teaching about contraception. the last 16, and fanatical and
and secondary level with science education. liz: how do we get people to be interested in science and engineering? >> it takes good curriculum, good teachers and good schools. as we all know, teachers can make all the difference in turning on student curiosity. it really takes a whole number of things to really come together. liz: how to look at what is happening today? unemployment dropped to 7.8%. on the surface, it looks good, some people question it. what do you see out there in the trenches as a business leader? >> well, in all honesty, there are a lot of people who are unemployed, there are actually quite a few who are underemployed. there is no question the economy is not creating as many good, solid high-paying jobs. liz: they always ask business people what the problem is and they say uncertainty. >> i do not think it is as much uncertainty. you have to have an increase in demand of your products that justify the need for more manufacturing, more employees and there is a point in fact for us in 2012 our volume is less than it was last year. there is not a lot of justifica
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
-based international academy of television, art, and sciences oversees the awards. its members include about 500 media and entertainment companies. >>> for an update on the weather forecast, here's mai shoji. mai? >>> indeed, it is the typhoon season, but one after another we have storms coming in. we have a couple of storms to talk about. let's start off with this one. this is the tropical storm maliksi. it is moving towards the islands. throughout the day tomorrow, the islands will be affected due to this storm and it will be intensifying into a secure tropical storm status by wednesday evening. from the afternoon, actually, it will be around this region, so it will be quickly moving away. maliksi is a fast-moving system. it will be picking up its pace tomorrow. but the ting that this will be doing is it will be enhancing the stationary boundary, which is just south of the eastern coast of the toho ka region. due to that earn jized stationary front, thunderstorms will be affecting the eastern region especially and some heavy down tour pours to be looking out for. another storm is the kami over the s
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
makes plastic models belter than tbel better than the japanese. love the intricate ones based on science fiction anime. >> to prepare the displays, lin got together with his friend. the work came naturally. and their entire generation grew up tinkering with plastic models. no detail is too small. not even window frames. all in all it takes three days to complete a single model. what they made is true to the structures, right down to the relief and the exteriors. i want people to take a pz tiff view in saving the houses. if we can protect values through the models, the houses may survive after all. but the arcade houses, unprotar protected by any regulations. they aren't officially registered as assets. lin and his friend hope their efforts will help protect the old homes before the only ones left are plastic models. >>> lots of sunshine, here in tokyo. time now for the world weather forecast. here is rachel ferguson. >> let's get you a check on tropical storm, sitting to tt east of the philippines. it picked up the piece, moving 15 kilometers an hour. tropical storm gaemi. it is going to
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
professor are the winners of the nobel prize in science. the prize is $1.2 million that they will share. a quick reminder of our top story, hugo chavez has hailed his presidential electoion win as a continuance of his socialist revolution. stay with us. there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet, los angeles.
the bet of the science research we can get on the space station. you have to bring in many cases samples, biological and pharmaceutical and material science experiments, they have to return samples to earth. >>trace: it will dock with the international space station on wednesday, stay there for three weeks and it before splashing de pacific ocean. >>shepard: there have been glitches? >>trace: the rocket which carries the capsule into space, it lost an engine on ascent and they had to rely on the other eight engines to get in orbit. nasa is very precise and will certainly want a full account from spacex about what happened. that could delay their next launch which is scheduled for january. spacex says the rockets are designed to be able to lose an engine and keep going. also, glitches happen. >> we will continue to always improve. we will learn from our flights and continue to improve the vehicle. given that we are looking toward flying crew on the vehicles, we want to make sure we address any and all items that we find and learn about it so we can make it more reliable. >>trace: spacex a
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs
. another standout stock, gilead sciences is up 70% year-to-date, ubs has it as its top large tech biotech pick, it's attractively trading to a discount to the biotech sector, biogen up 50% in the past year thanks to its strong earnings performance and anticipation riding behind its multiple sclerosis drug bg12 which could get approval by year's end. another is buyout speculation. the firms are on the hunt for under the radar biotech firms, bristol-myers among others making big bets. andrew you've been following that as well. >> thank you for that report. lot of beta. see if there's any alpha. >>> in the next hour of "squawk box" former ubs american chairman robert wolf will join us to talk financials, jobs and the election, mr. obama's favorite banker. and later health care, a major issue for americans in the presidential candidates, the coo of mt. sinai, ken david, is going to join us. a crash management system and the world's only tridion safety cell which can withstand over three and a half tons. small in size. big on safety. which can withstand over three and a half tons. if we want t
from poll to poll. there's no science to this. polls will differ on that number, depending on what they're finding in the field and it will drive you crazy to dig deep into the poll and say this one has more democrats, this one has more republicans. look at the trends over time. we have two polls. we want ten polls off this debate, we want to know where the race really is. all we have is gallup and pew. it's showing a huge bump up for romney. all these polls have a house effect. over time they all show in the course of 2012 a little bit of an advantage for one candidate or another. rasmussen very often shows a pro-republican house effect. pew has very often shown a pro-obama effect. it makes this huge romney lead even more surprising. wait for a week's worth of polls and we'll see where the race stands. as you point out, this is the best news romney has had since before his convention. >> does this couldn't as an october surprise. >> usually october surprises is some outside event that changes the election or something -- some conspiracy that a campaign polls at the last second to advan
first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> market is down 30 points. we were talking to david kotok at beginning of show how many investors got out of the market. what is mistake it is because stocks are up 9%. >> people looking at true fundamentals true health of the global economy can't really deny that, tracy. melissa: that is the juice market is running. tracy: you guys talked a lot about it. a lot of hedge funds closed up shop on september 30th, called it a day and wrapped it up with a nice little bow. we'll see what happens with the fiscal cliff. >> what did you do with ashley? tracy: he is home with his mama. i'm tracy byrnes, ashley will be back on wednesday. american companies beware. the house intelligence committee says doing business with two chinese telecom firms actually threatens our national security. >>> gas prices soaring once again in california. the state points the finger at refinery supply problems but we'll tell you why california's own regulations are really to blame. >>> just 29 days to go before t
? the truth is that highly skilled immigrants with degrees in science, technology, engineering and math, aka, the stem jobs create jobs for other americans. according to one study from 2000 to 2007 for every 100 foreign born workers who earned an advanced stem degree here in the united states and went on to work in those fields, that created an additional 262 jobs for native born americans. instead of embracing this the u.s. immigration policy sends those highly skilled immigrants many of them educated in the best american colleges and universities back home to their countries of origin so they can create jobs there competing against the u.s. by the way in the global economy. it's called the reverse brain drain. joining me is a director of research at duke university and a fellow at stamford law school and the author of "the immigrant exodus, why america is losing the global race to capture entrepreneurial talent." from 1995 to 2005 immigrants founded more than a quarter of all tech and engineering startups in united states and more than 52% of those in silicon valley. you just updated the n
&d, science-based a physical science-based breakthrough. most of it has come from commercialization of the internet which is not as scientific and research based as we typically think of as occurring in universities house of representatives my undergraduate degree is in electrical engineering and look what i'm doing. i take your point. i vaguely remember the three laws of dynamics. so yeah, i take your point but my point is less would've the undergraduate, i don't know we can argue but how important that is, but more, i take your point about the commercialization and the browsers and all that was definitely private, occasional borrowing for more basic research, but my point was that seems like a really critical element was sort of just was the critical mass of people out there, and the guys who founded google were guys who were getting their ph.d's at stanford, you know, and they developed an algorithm out of their training. and just the fact that she did have people working on systems engineering, and it's less the undergraduate but more the government finance, dod research, networ
sciences. >> this is a company i don't recommend stocks on a take overbasis. i don't like the fundamentals at sce. let's go to greg in new hampshire. greg? >> caller: jim, big boo-yah. >> hey, greg. >> caller: how do you like questcor? >> you can't. now they added this dividend and that's terrific, but they were not as -- let's say they really made you feel great about the situation before they should have. how about that? let's go to sam in missouri. sam? >>. >> caller: jim, thank you for taking my all. osur. >> everyone is selling it off now because the drug is selling and no one is selling. all the anticipation is going. i like the stock at 10. i think it's cheap. let's go to robin in california. robin? >> caller: hello, jim. diagoe. >> if that come downs, that's the danny walker family and they're doing quite well. >> caller: hey, jim cramer, i wanted to wish you a big boo-yah. >> thank you, same. >> caller: i want to know how do you feel about esrx? >> express scripts, that merger -- >> buy, buy, buy! >> that stock doesn't come in. when it does come in, i need you to pull the trigger.
academy of sciences in stockholm made the announcement on tuesday. professor hideshi hara from the ecole normale superieure paris and university of colorado physicist david wineland were honored for their breakthroughs in quantum physics. they studied the interaction of light and matter. the field has been rapidly progressing since the mid-80s. haroche and wineland's research is serving as the basis for super fast computers currently in development. >>> japan's prime minister has achieved something he won't be celebrating. an nhk poll suggests the support rate for yoshihiko noda and his cabinet has fallen to its lowest level since his government was sworn in september last year. nhk surveyed 1,056 people between saturday and monday. participants were aged 20 and older. they gave the cabinet the support rate of 26%. that's down five percentage points from last month's survey. the number of voter who is don't support the cabinet is up by five points to 58%. the support rate for the prime minister's democratic party hit its lowest level since it took office. it fell by three percentage poin
ttv takes on politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: with 28 days until the 2012 election, we have entered the lamest of lame duck sessions. with the outcome still unclear, no one on capitol hill wants to do anything to affect their party's reelection. today brought more bad news. president obama was pulling away from mitt romney then he flopped in the most lopsided debate of all times. and now the policy poll shows a two point lead for mitt romney. >> so even wealthy people -- would you put a cap on how much they could deduct for example as far as charitable contributes are concerned? because i have heard you mention the $17,000 cap if you will for come folks out there and i would like you to elaborate if you don't mind. >> i don't intend to lay out a piece of legislation here because i intend to work with congress. >> eliot: members of congress are already trying to form a plan of their own to avoid the upcoming fiscal cliff. on tues
of a books will look at science history, the cyberworld, popular culture, live at noon eastern on book tv on c-span 2. >> the bureau of labor statistics has announced the unemployment rate has dropped from 8.1% to 7.8% in september, the lowest level since january 2009. president obama spoken by the job picture at this venue at george mason university. it is about 30 minutes. >> hello, everybody! [cheers and applause] hello, george mason! hello, patriots! [cheers and applause] good to see you guys. thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you! thank you. thank you so much. thank you. [cheers and applause] thank you. everybody, have a seat. have a seat. thank you. well, it is good to be here. i am so proud to have katherine's support. can you give her a big round of applause for that great introduction. [applause] it's also good to know that we've got the former governor and next united states senator from the commonwealth of virginia, tim kaine! and your congressman, jerry conley. [cheers] and good to see all of you. so one month. just one month from tomorrow, virginia, you're goi
as a politicalf th science and journalism -- he pivoted to some of the positions that he explicitly set aside during the primaries, where he became truly one of the most -- there were others, rick santorum and newt gingrich -- extremist candidates on key issues that appeal to independents. when a pos -- one of the most interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
with the -- its struggles with the slowing economy. another medical device maker, edward life sciences, its stock is up about 23% so far this year. it is taking a huge hit in today's session, down about 18% right now. it said that its third quarter sales are going to be weak. their heart valve sales in particular they said have been hurt by european us-- european austerity measures. they also said slower than expected growth in the united states hurt earnings there as well. coming up after the bell, alcoa and yum! brands, we will have a preview, same time next hour. connell dagen back to you. connell: keep it here on markets now talking about small business with big problems. dagen: the head of the national federation of independent business with a dire warning about the business environment. coming up in moments. >> announcer: meet mary. she loves to shop online with her debit card, and so does bill, an identity thief who stole mary's identity, took over her bank accounts and stole her hard-earned money. now meet jack. after 40 years, he finally saved enough to enjoy retirement. angie, the waitr
better back it up. >>eliot spitzer takes on politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. >> eliot: if you want to lower the abortion rate there is an effective way to do it without changing the law. you can see it in our number of the day 61% that's how much birth rate fell when birth control was given away for free. this came out of a study by washington university, 9,000 women, many of whom were poor and uninsured were offered contraceptives without cost. most got iuds or other implants which are the most effective option and usually quite expensive. but the drop in pregnancy more than made up in the expense. that is good news. we may soon see similar results across the country. the president's affordable care act gives access to contraceptive. if you're home of the brave. ♪ ♪ it's where fear goes unwelcomed... ♪ ♪ and certain men... find a way to rise above. this is the land of giants. ♪ ♪ guts. glory. ram. >> eliot: coming up, was wednesday night the best
? that means the world has to be like 90% air. that's just science. think it's weird to collect air? you wouldn't think so if you saw what your lungs collect every time you breathe. people can make fun of me all they want, but i choose to see the glass half-full. of air. protect your health with life-saving air quality updates from the american lung association. get our free "state of the air" app at lung.org. ♪ john: in america of the welfare state grows and government takes more power. i hope that will change, but i'm not optimistic as thomas jefferson said, the natural progressive things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground. he said that years ago, and he has been proven right. what if there was a way to create a new kind of government, a more limited one that jefferson had in mind that helps poor people by freeing the free-market to work its magic. a free city not too far from the united states where americans could move. that may happen cent. a central american country recently signed an agreement with a group of investors to build a privately run city. its own police fo
. with schools. i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that are out there. i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. manufacturing. i want to close loopholes that companies shipping jobs overseas. oil and natural gas production have been higher than they have been in years. we have to look at the energy those investments. all of this is possible. we have to close our deficit. we will discuss how we deal with our tax code and how we make sure we are reducing spending in a response away and have enough revenue to make those investments. governor romney's central economic plan calls for a $5 trillion tax cut on top of the extension of the bush tax cut. $2 trillion in additional military spending -- without dumping the cost on the middle-class americans. that is one of the central questions of this campaign. >> you have spoken about a lot of different things. governor romney, do you have a said? you're talking about. we have to provide tax relief to people in
. it is bringing science equipment up here but more importantly is chocolate swirl ice cream for the iss crew. second launch of a dragon ship by the company space x. that is your 5@5:00. >>> we are now fewer than 30-days away from the presidential election. both president obama and mitt romney pulling out all of the stops. >> a few hours from now mitt romney will deliver a major foreign policy speech. doug is live with more. >> good morning guys. good to see you all. it is the home stretch all signs of this race is really tightening up. the swing state advantage the president had early last week has now evaporated largely after romney's strong de late last week. his weekend crowds were among the largest of the campaign rallies today. >> i am not convinced you will have a chance to hear his answers or nonanswers. now of course days later we are hearing his excuses and next january we will be watching him leave the white house for the last time. >>> as you said romney will have the swing state in lexington. in anticipation of that address the obama campaign releasing an ad that attacks his rece
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. i don't spend money on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a small amount that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male announcer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> i wants to introduce you to one of the highest yielding companies left in this market. even if you're hitting a 52-week high today, npw who owns proper
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
science and technology new study. you know those norwegians are very tidy. they don't want to pollute the environment. but they say global warming, potential of electric vehicle production is twice that of conventional vehicles is basically twice as bad is what they're trying to say. and number one, they say that in studies in the past they didn't consider the impact of charging the battery. that the generating of the electricity to charge the battery if it comes from a coal plant, comes from a nuclear plant, you're kind of defeating the purpose of having a cleaner vehicle because you used this other dirty way to make the electricity. what do you say? >> well, that would be true if the majority of our electricity was still coming from coal but we've had some radical changes in the electric generation sector in the united states over the last couple of years. driven primarily by steadily declining natural gas prices. as a result, for the first time in american history, we are generating more of our electricity today from natural gas than from coal. natural gas is almost 2/3 cleaner tha
of jealousy. >> he's advancing science and he'll do a great job. >> reporter: and that's key here. the records mean a lot. but what this team wants to get out of this is the scientific and aerospace advancements. they want to see if that suit that felix is going to wear is going to be the next generation spacesuit, to see if people can survive outside a space vehicle inside event of a malfunction. >> what a soir, brian, thank you. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, mitt romney says president obama is leading from behind. but he isn't the first to use that description. we have the reporter who heard it first from a member of the obama administration. >>> we also have inside information about vice president joe biden's preparations for his crucial debate with paul ryan. and depending on how old you are, you're going to find out how much money you will need to save right now to have a comfortable retirement. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin this hour with mitt romney's declarati
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> sean: the first presidential debate is two days away. judging by the president's language, seems he may be trying to downplay his upcoming performance. oh, really? >> you may have heard that in a few days my opponent in this election and i are going to have a debate. i'm looking -- i'm looking forward to it. i know folks in the media are speculating already on who's going to have the best zingers. >> you are! >> i don't know about that. who's going put the most points on the board. governor romney is a good debater. i'm just okay. >> sean: and you get a failing grade as president. who cares about zingers, when all the governor has to do is point out your awful record. joining me is author of "the new york times" bestseller "mugged" and columnist david limbaugh. >> thank you. >> sean: he's really good, but i'm terrible. mr. teleprompter -- >> by the way, why is he saying this if the show him far ahead? they know the polls are a crock. i know -- >> s
science. you don't want to pick winners and losers in the companies that are going to survive. national science foundation obviously. >> good loan guarantees can be targeted. there are many ways to do things. one of the things that arianna has been discussing and i've found very compelling is this notion that we should provide opportunities and channels for national service in a variety of industries. this is something industry could do. i've been very involved with teach for america but you could have not only a teacher's corps, you could have medical corps, you could have financial services corps of young people coming out of college, having trouble finding a job but with industry associations, companies saying we're going to create interns and a service program where people can work for a year, maybe two years, learning a trade, learning a profession, whether they're trying to do legal services for america or financial services for america, or health or for that matter engineering, encoding, i think there are many ways for the private sector to work together with government to say he
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> about five minutes to go until the closing bell right now. dow jones industrial average just off the lows. we were up earlier but gave up most of the gains. nasdaq has been in negative territory for a while. time for the closing countdown. >> david is back with us. also with us is kenny from i-cap. good to have you here. >> pleasure. >> poof, all the excitement about the jobs report just gone. >> we had the initial rally this morning, the euphoria. >> why? >> it's friday afternoon. i think the markets had the great move. people are suspect of the number. so they took money off the table. i think it makes perfect sense considering next week is earnings season. we're going to start off in earnest and see how it goes. we're prepared for a less than stellar earnings report. i think the market is tired. >> you think now we're going to have a tough time into the elections? there are a lot of people who think going into the elections with governor romney looking a little bit better, this will be supportive of the markets.
estrich, a fox news contributor and professor of law and political science at the university of southern california. let's do it. we are operating within the margin of error. general consensus, saying president obama was less than effervescent in the first of the debates. but, those latest... >> effervescent is kind. >> arthel: the poll numbers -- i try. the poll numbers, the governor, gosh romney came out with shining stars and does it mean, the stakes are higher for the vp debate? voters are actually looking into the debates and are tuning in and, are looking for answers. >> vp debates matter, if they -- if vp debates matter i would have been attorney general top of the united states instead of back to teaching and you played the clip, where bentsen squashed dan quayle and, we had our campaign chairman and governor clinton and our top staff and went to a little bar, across the street, and we were high, high on excitement and we waited for the numbers to come in from our pollster and when we called him, he said you want the good news or the bad news? and, i always go for bad news and he
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